P

Pellucidity

  • Of Meditation and Revelations

    Remus Lupin is starting his second year at Hogwarts (it's a miracle he's gotten this far, frankly). This year is likely to be even more eventful, what with an annoying new Defense Against the Dark Arts professor, Shakespeare classes, meditation sessions, a familiar new neighbor, and the fact that his friends are drawing closer and closer to the truth with every passing day...

  • Supposed to Be at the Beach

    The year is 1971, and Ministry official Wilma Harrington is called into work to discuss Albus Dumbledore's latest plan: inviting a WEREWOLF to attend Hogwarts. In the days that follow, Wilma finds herself locked in an intense battle of wits with Dumbledore himself as her beliefs and values are put into question. She never signed up for this. She was supposed to be at the beach.

  • Of Marauders and Monsters

    Remus Lupin was proud to say that he was very normal, thank you very much... Oh, who was he kidding? Remus Lupin was not normal whatsoever, even by wizarding standards. In fact, he was probably the most abnormal child in the area—in the country—on the continent—in the world? He wouldn't be surprised.

  • Platypus

    Hope Lupin, the mother of Remus Lupin, is a Muggle. She knows nearly nothing of wizarding culture. She has a tragic, confusing family. She can't do the things her husband can, and her life can be a handful sometimes. But Hope is a good mother, a good wife, and a good person, and she's going to adapt to any circumstance that comes her way through sheer power of will.

  • The Marauders' Complicated Relationship with the Latin Language

    Sirius and Remus both learn Latin at age eight, but for completely different reasons. James learns two words, but he has to go through great lengths to do so. And Peter never cares to study more than he has to. One-shot.

  • Hermione and the Hat Have a Interesting Chat

    The war has shed an unsavory light on seemingly innocent traditions, and now Hermione has questions—particularly about the merits of a system that pushes children into boxes. She borrows the Sorting Hat from the school (not to worry; she got permission) and sits down to discuss human nature, psychology, and individual values. One-shot.